Blogs > Elm City Express

Do you want your news in a nutshell? If so, Elm City Express is the source for you. We are a service of the New Haven Register, but we will provide a slightly different daily dose of New Haven happenings, all wrapped up in the same place. We love to hear from the community and will post your news for you, often in your words! Remember: Local news is our story. Contact us at: hbennettharvey@nhregister.com. We would love to hear from you.

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Connecticut Department of Agriculture receives grant for large animal facility

The state Department of Agriculture has received a grant of slightly more than $50,000 from The John T. and Jane A. Wiederhold Foundation to make improvements to its Niantic facility where horses and other large animals seized in neglect cases are rehabilitated for public adoption, according to a release..
  
"The $51,600 grant will be used to build new paddock and pasture fences and purchase equipment such as stall mats, horse blankets, a hot water heater and veterinary items used in the Second Chance program," the release said.. 
 
"Located at York Correctional Facility in Niantic, the Second Chance program is a collaboration"  between the departments of  Agriculture and Correction, the release said. " Inmates from York volunteer to work with the animals in partnership with agency personnel." 
 
“For 11 years this program has proven to be beneficial for both the animals and the inmates,” said  Agriculture Commissioner Steven K. Reviczky, also in the statement.  “The support of the Wiederhold Foundation is very much appreciated and will help us continue to give the animals the care they deserve.”
 
 
"The Wiederhold Foundation was created in 2012 to protect and improve the welfare of animals of all kinds; the promotion of veterinary programs and the protection of wildlife, including endangered animals and plants. The grant was received through the Community Foundation of Northwest Connecticut."
                                                                               
Those interested in adopting an animal through the Second Chance program should contact Animal Control Officer Linda Wenner at 860-713-2567 or Linda.Wenner@ct.gov. Potential adopters are screened and are required to sign a contract that the animal will be cared for properly.
                                                                               
Editor's note: All information in this post was contributed.  In the photo: DoAg Animal Control Officer Nancy Jarvis leads Santana as Isis closely follows.  Both horses are available for public adoption though the Second Chance program.
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Fairfield Public Library to talk household chemical at upcoming talk


 
"Safer Home, Safer Family" A Wellness Series Talk at the Fairfield Public Library


FAIRFIELD  - Environmental nurse-specialist Linda Russell-Getz will review 10 ways to reduce your exposure to "consumer products we use every day contain toxic chemicals" and show you how you can make your own products in an event at 7 p.m. May 5  in the Rotary Room at the Main Library, 1080 Old Post Road,  according to a release . 
 
"You will leave with some of her favorite recipes using common ingredients you may already have on hand," according to the release.  
 
Registration is requested.

 
Presenter Linda Russell-Getz, RN, BSN, MS, CCAP is an integrative nurse and owner of InTandem Wellness for Women in Westport, the release said.

 
All programs at the Fairfield Public Library are free. 
 
To register, or for more information on this and other programs, visit us online at:  www.fairfieldpubliclibrary.org or call 203-256-3160. Follow the Fairfield Public Library on Twitter: www.twitter.com/fairfieldpublib and Facebook: www.facebook.com/fairfieldlibrary. 

 

Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 24-11 announces next boating class



WEST HAVEN — U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 24-11 is will hold a one-day "About Boating Safely" class  from 8 a.m.  to 4:30 p.m. May 3, organizers said in a release

 

In a classroom format, attendees will learn general information about boats and maintenance, navigation rules and aids to navigation, what to do in case of boating emergencies and Connecticut-specific law and regulations, the release said.  

People  who successfully complete the course will qualify for both the Connecticut Safe Boating Certificate and the Certificate of Personal Watercraft Operation.  

The course fee is $60.  

 

The class will be held at the USCG Auxiliary West Haven Flotilla facility, 1 Kimberly Avenue.  

 For more information or to register, contact either Charlie Phippen at (860) 828-5438 or David Wendelowski at(203) 932-2651.  

Information and on-line registration is available at http://a0142411.uscgaux.info/educ.html. A free State of CT Conservation ID Number must be obtained before the class by registering at ct.outdoorcentral.net.

 

Bank of America is Closer to Free Ride’s presenting sponsor

NEW HAVEN -  Bank of America has signed on as the Closer to Free Ride’s first-ever presenting sponsor,  officials from Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven announced in a release.
 
“The Ride has become a marquis fundraising event for Smilow, and serves as an annual rallying point for cancer survivors and their support teams,” Bill Tommins, Southern Connecticut market president, Bank of America said, also in the release. “Our involvement will help amplify the Ride’s reach, bringing even more attention to an anchor institution in our community.” 
 
The Closer to Free Ride is scheduled for Sept. 6, with routes of 25, 62.5 and 100 miles, the release said. 
"The Ride has been called the 'best organized ride in Connecticut' and is the signature fundraising event for Smilow Cancer Hospital," the release said. "Last year, more than 1,000 participants helped raise over $1.2 million to support patient programs and research at Smilow. 100% of the dollars raised by Riders and Volunteers are directed back to Smilow."
 
“We are very pleased with the commitment and reception we have received from Bank of America,” Kevin J. Walsh, vice president of development at Yale-New Haven Hospital said in the release. “On behalf of the Development office and senior administration at Yale-New Haven Hospital, I would like to extend my gratitude to Bank of America for their generous support. Not only does every dollar help support a very important cause, but it also helps bring us closer to a world free of cancer.”
 
Also in the release: 
 
"Cancer survivors, patients, family, friends, experienced athletes and riders of all skill levels and abilities are encouraged to ride. Each cyclist must pay a $100 registration fee, and raise a minimum of $400 to ride. For anyone interested in Riding or Volunteering, visit www.rideclosertofree.org or contact rideclosertofree@ynhh.org."
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Editor's note: All information in this post was contributed. Click one of the buttons below to share it.

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Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Orange Historical Society Antique Shop has plenty for those shopping for gifts

"The Orange Historical Society Antique Shop is brimming with gifts for the gift-giving season," leaders said in a release.
"For those confirmations, weddings and just because, the shopper can find many interesting antiques,
vintage jewelry, collectibles and much more to satisfy those many occasions that the coming season brings."
Stop by each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and check out the recent items.
The shop is at 605 Orange Center Road, across from the Green.

For more information call 203 795-3106.


Editor's note: All information in this post was contributed. Click one of the buttons below to share it.

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New Haven Symphony Orchestra Pops to present veteran's salute

NEW HAVEN - The New Haven Symphony Orchestra Pops will present "Jerry’s Cabaret – A Veteran’s Salute" at 2:20 p.m. May 3 at Hamden Middle School and Sunday, May 4 at 3 p.m. May 4 at Shelton Intermediate School, according to a release. 
 
Tickets are selling fast at www.NewHavenSymphony.org, the release said.  
 
Tickets are $35 and $45 and can be purchased through the NHSO Box Office at 203.865.0831 x10 or www.NewHavenSymphony.org.  Blue Star tickets for families of active duty military personnel are free.  Student tickets are always $10; KidTix (ages 6-17) are free with a paying adult, the release said.. 
 
The performance will help the audience "journey through the decades with evocative love songs celebrating the lives of soldiers, culminating in a stirring salute to our veterans," the release said.
 
  "Conductor Jerry Steichen brings his unique approach as a storyteller to the performance as he leads soprano Sarah Uriarte Berry and baritone Jim Weizter in a medley of the soaring love songs and melancholy goodbyes that punctuate the lives of our veterans," the release said.
From World War II there will be  songs by Cole Porter (“Where is the Life that Late I Led?”), Leonard Bernstein (“I Can Cook Too”), and Richard Rodgers (“I Wish I Were in Love Again”), and the Vietnam era with Harry Mancini’s “Moon River” from "Breakfast at Tiffany’s" and Stephen Sondheim’s “Send in the Clowns” from "A Little Night Music, the release said.
 
"Today’s anthems, such as “I’m Yours” by Jason Mraz and “Why Can’t I Kiss You” by Jeff Blumenkrantz, bring audiences to the end of an emotional journey celebrating the lives and loves of America’s service members.  The concert will conclude with a rousing medley honoring each service and asking that veterans in the audience stand and be recognized for their courage and sacrifice."  
 
 
 Shelton Pops Series Sponsor R.D. Scinto; Hamden Pops Series Sponsor Whitney Center; Season Media Sponsor New Haven Register.
 
Editor's note: All information in this post was contributed. Click one of the buttons below to share it.

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Wine tasting event will benefit New Haven shelter service for the homeless


 
NEW HAVEN - Emergency Shelter Management Services Inc. will hold  a Wine Tasting Event from 6 to 9:30 p.m. May 15 at the Sage American Grill & Oyster Bar, 100 South Water St., organizers said in a release.

All tickets can be purchased at 645 Grand Ave. or by calling (203) 777-2522, the release said.  Donation is $50.
The event will benefit the homeless population of the Greater New Haven Area.

Sage will cater the event and Mount Carmel Wine and Spirits will provide wine samples, the release said.

Connecticut MUFON presents: 'UFOs Over Malmstrom Air Force Base' Saturday

http://www.temporaldoorway.com/mufonct/Connecticut MUFON (Mutual UFO Network) said in a release that is will present a program on "UFOs Over Malmstrom Air Force Base" at 11 a.m. Saturday (April 26) at St. Catherine's School, Rooms 104 and 105,  4 Riverside Ave. Riverside, Conn.
Admission is free and coffee and light refreshments will be provided, organizers said in the release.  

 For further information: 203-637-9619

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Monday, April 21, 2014

New England First Amendment Coalition offers New England First Amendment Institute sponsorships

The New England First Amendment Coalition is planning its fourth annual New England First Amendment Institute for September 2014. NEFAC is offering sponsorships for the
conference.
"New England First Amendment Institute is an intensive training course on freedom of information laws and investigative techniques offered to selected journalists from across New England.
It brings together a stellar faculty of journalists and First Amendment attorneys to offer an extraordinary learning experience to the New England First Amendment Institute fellows."

See more here:


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New Haven Museum to open 'Nothing is Set in Stone: The Lincoln Oak and the New Haven Green'

NEW HAVEN - –On Wednesday, April 30, 2014, from 5 to 8 p.m. April 30, the New Haven Museum will hold an opening reception for an exhibition that pairs "powerful interpretive art created by seven well-known Connecticut artists with scientific analysis by noted bioarchaeologists in 'Nothing is Set in Stone: The Lincoln Oak and the New Haven Green,'” according to a release.
 
The event will be "an informative and revelatory tribute to the historic Lincoln Oak on the New Haven Green," the release said. "In October 2012, winds from Hurricane Sandy toppled the mighty oak—planted in 1909 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth—revealing human skeletal remains in the tree’s exposed roots and creating an enigmatic story that captured the imagination of the entire country."
 
The opening reception is free. The exhibition runs through Nov. 2.


"For the artistic portion of 'Nothing is Set in Stone: The Lincoln Oak and the New Haven Green,' area artists were invited to use branches, limbs, or pieces of the trunk of the Lincoln Oak to interpret the history of the tree and the discovery of the skeletal remains beneath it. The exhibit includes two works by noted Hamden sculptor, Susan Clinard, who says of her Lincoln Oak sculpture, 'Of the Same Branch; Portraits of the Civil War, 2014,': “I found a long branch from the Lincoln oak and wanted to tie the human experience together by sculpting several seemingly very different people from the civil war era from the same branch…to show a slave family and a Yankee and Confederate soldier. I looked at hundreds of civil war photographs and drew inspiration from the many hazy images I saw; trying to offer up each their story.”


Other artists included in the exhibition are Lani Asuncion, Erich Davis, Michael Quirk, Jeff Slomba, Rachael A. Vaters-Carr and Alison Walsh. The collected works include mixed-media sculpture and video, the release said.

Photo contributed by Roderick Topping.         


Also in the release:
"The New Haven Green was used as a burying ground throughout Colonial times and until 1812. The Lincoln Oak was planted in 1909 by local members of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) —an organization of Civil War veterans--in honor of President Abraham Lincoln. In 2012, the uprooted tree revealed several surprises including two time capsules buried in 1909 by members of the GAR, and the remains of several 18th-century residents of New Haven.


“One hundred fifty years later, President Lincoln and the Civil War continue to fascinate us,” says New Haven Museum Executive Director Margaret Anne Tockarshewsky. “We expect that the public may have a strong response to both the artists’ interpretations and the findings of the scientists who continue to examine the remains found beneath the Lincoln Oak.”


The New Haven Museum was gifted with the contents of the time capsules uprooted by the Lincoln Oak by The Committee of the Proprietors of the Common and Undivided Lands of New Haven, and a sampling of the artifacts is on display at the Museum.


The research was supported by The Committee of the Proprietors of the Common and Undivided Lands in New Haven; Yale University, Department of Anthropology; and Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Archaeology Center, University of Connecticut.


“Nothing is Set in Stone” follows a panel discussion at the New Haven Museum on October 31, 2013, which revealed the initial findings of the team of scientists charged with investigating the human remains and time capsules discovered on the Green. The panel is expected to reconvene and present concluding details of the team’s research in late October, 2014, coinciding with the two-year anniversary of the toppling of the Lincoln Oak.


About the New Haven Museum
The New Haven Museum, founded in 1862 as the New Haven Colony Historical Society, is located in downtown New Haven at 114 Whitney Avenue. The Museum is currently celebrating 150 years of collecting, preserving and interpreting the history and heritage of Greater New Haven. Through its collections, exhibitions, programs and outreach, the Museum brings 375 years of New Haven history to life. For more information visit www.newhavenmuseum.org or facebook.com/NewHavenMuseum or call 203-562-4183." Editor's note: All information in this post was contributed. Click one of the buttons below to share it.

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Naugatuck Valley hero brought back to life: Reenactment stars Ansonia's David Humphreys


WETHERSFIELD - Horseman David Loda will reenact mock battle scenes as Lt. Col. David Humphreys, (think Valley resident and Yale grad!) aide-de-camp to Gen. George Washington, during the sixth annual Revolutionary War Encampment at the Webb-Deane-Stevens  Museum from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.May 24, 2014, at 211 Main St., Old Wethersfield.

 
The event will follow the Wethersfield Memorial Day parade, according to a release.
 
Admission to the encampment is free; regular admission rates will be charged for optional tours of the museum, the release said. Loda, a retired Navy pilot from the 21st-century, will demonstrate 'horsemanship with arms,'” skills from the 18th-century, including both sword and pistol," the release said. "He creates a dashing figure in full Continental uniform and tri-corn hat and astride his gleaming Morgan horse, Huckleberry."
 
"When Loda portrays Humphreys—barreling across a battlefield toward a “soldier” portrayed by a melon perched atop a post— visitors easily grasp the level of discomfort their forbears felt when faced with a charging, sword-wielding horseman. "
 

Also in the release: "The WDS Revolutionary War Encampment also includes members of the 54th Regiment of Foot, a dashing band of British redcoats whose safety is uncertain once they commence a “surprise” attack on the Continental soldiers at 1 p.m. Also featured will be the wildly popular fare created by Liberty Tea, bakers who create delicious homemade treats from historic recipes, using all-natural ingredients, which sold out at the 2013 encampment."

"The WDS Revolutionary War Encampment offers visitors the chance to interact closely with members of the Fifth Connecticut Regiment in full Colonial costume, with entertaining demonstrations of marching and musket firing, 18th-century open-fire cookery, and enchanting harp and dulcimer music. Shortly after the regiment partakes of its midday meal, children in attendance will be invited to learn to march and perform drills with wooden “muskets.” The British are expected to attack at 1 p.m. A fascinating display and discussion of the medical and surgical techniques used in the late 1700s, and an exhibit of period clothing and fashions, are also featured. The encampment is underwritten, in part, by a grant from the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of Connecticut.
David Humphreys served as principal of the Wethersfield public school following his graduation from Yale University in 1771. During the American Revolution, he served as aide-de-camp to generals Putnam, Greene, and finally from 1780 to the end of the war, George Washington. Loda’s portrayal of Humphreys at the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum encampment is particularly significant as the Joseph Webb House is where General Washington and French Lieutenant General Rochambeau planned the joint military campaign that led to the victory at Yorktown, Virginia, and the end of the American Revolutionary War. Humphreys had the honor of delivering the surrendered British flags from the Battle of Yorktown to the Continental Congress.
 

About the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum
Located in the heart of Connecticut’s largest historic district, the Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum consists of three authentically restored 18th-century homes and provides the quintessential New England experience - from the American Revolution to the early 20th century. Tours include the 1752 Joseph Webb House, where General George Washington met with French General Rochambeau, and planned the military campaign leading to the end of the Revolutionary War, the 1770 Silas Deane House, built for America’s first diplomat to France, and the 1788 Isaac Stevens House - depicting life in the 18th and 19th centuries through original family objects and a fascinating children’s exhibit. For rates and hours visit www.webb-deane-stevens.org  or call (860) 529-0612, ext. 12."

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Naugatuck Valley Community College horticulture students to hold sale of ornamental and edible crops

WATERBURY - Students in Naugatuck Valley Community College’s Horticulture Program spent the last semester cultivating ornamental and edible crops that they will sell from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,  May 5-9 in the Technology Hall Greenhouse, 750 Chase Parkway, according to a release. 
 
"The spring bedding plants fill the greenhouse this time of year and are the outcome of sustainable production practices in the horticulture classes," the release said.

 
“Interest in sustainable crop production is on the rise, throughout the state and at the college” program coordinator Christopher Tuccio said, also in the relese. “Students learn about an integrated pest management approach that focuses on small preventative measures that are sensitive to the environment.”
 

"Horticulture students work in teams or individually throughout the semester to grow a particular crop, learning about the plant’s water requirements, nutrient needs and possible complications," the release said. "Some of the edible crops are used at the college for events, classes and luncheons put on by the Hospitality Program. 


 
Also in the release:
"The NVCC Horticulture Program is a career-oriented degree program that leads students toward an Associate of Science in Horticulture.  Upon successful completion, students are prepared for immediate employment within the green-industry or to move on to a four-year institution, if desired.  The program includes two full years of study and an appropriate, supervised cooperative work experience that places students in greenhouses, wholesale nurseries, landscape businesses, and agricultural extension agencies.  Graduates of the program find work in a variety of disciplines as greenhouse managers, landscape designers, pest management supervisors, community farmers, plant propagators and more."

 For more information about the sale or the horticulture program, contact Tuccio at ctuccio@nv.edu or 203-596-8634.


Naugatuck Valley Community College serves Beacon Falls, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bridgewater, Brookfield, Cheshire, Danbury, Middlebury, Naugatuck, New Fairfield, New Milford, Newtown, Oxford, Prospect, Roxbury, Sherman, Southbury, Thomaston, Washington, Waterbury, Watertown and Woodbury. The College is located on a 110-acre campus at 750 Chase Parkway, Waterbury, Conn., and in Danbury at 183 Main Street. The College is one of 17 institutions governed by the Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education. Visit nv.edu for more information.
 
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New England First Amendment Coalition partners with 'OpenTheGovernment'

The New England First Amendment Coalition said in a release that it is partnering with OpenTheGovernment, "a Washington, D.C.-based group working to make the federal government more open and accountable".

 
"This partnership is a way to further the reach of NEFAC and the important work we do," said Rose Cavanagh, executive director of the New England First Amendment Coalition, also in the release. "By allying with OpenTheGovernment, we are strengthening the call for government accountability and adding our coalition among the ranks of other pro-transparency groups across the nation.
 
Read more about the coalition here.

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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Celebrate Your Favorite Poem with Former Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky at Fairfield Public Library


FAIRFIELD - The Fairfield Public Library invites you to  "bring a poem to read and share with one of America’s most eminent poets, Robert Pinsky," at 2 p.m.  April 27 in the Memorial Room at the Main Library, 1080 Old Post Road, according to a release. 

A reception with the poet will follow, the release said. 
"Shortly after being appointed poet laureate in 1997, Pinsky founded the Favorite Poem Project to celebrate, document and encourage poetry’s role in American’s lives.  Thousands of Favorite Poem readings have followed.  Add your voice to the Project when we have our reading here in Fairfield.  Registration is requested," the release said.

Pinsky’s most recent book, "Singing School: Learning to Write (and Read) Poetry by Studying with the Masters," will be available for purchase and signing at the event, the release said. 
 
All programs at the Fairfield Public Library are free, the release said.  To register, or for more information on this and other programs, visit us online at: www.fairfieldpubliclibrary.org, or call 203-256-3160.  Follow the Fairfield Public library on Twitter:   and Facebook:

Editor's note: All information in this post was contributed. Click one of the buttons below to share it.

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Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation to hold open house

BLOOMFIELD -  Fidelco Guide Dog Foundation will open its doors to the public for a free Open House from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. May 3 at its headquarters, One Vision Way. 

This free, fun-filled event features an array of family-friendly activities including behind-the-scenes tours of the Fidelco campus; puppy playtime; and police K9 and guide dog demonstrations, according to a release.
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Experience what it means to “trust the dog” by taking a blindfold walk with professional Fidelco Certified Trainers and Guide Dogs.
Area Lions Club members will also conduct vision screenings on-site, the release said. 

"Fidelco breeds and trains its elite German Shepherd Guide Dogs for people who are blind across North America. It takes two years, 15,000 hands-on hours and $45,000 to produce each Fidelco Guide Dog, and they are given to clients at no cost." 

Since its founding in 1960, Fidelco remains the only Connecticut-headquartered guide dog school. The non-profit organization relies solely on the gifts and the generosity of individuals, foundations, corporations and civic organizations to help it Share The Vision®.

Fidelco’s Open House is held rain or shine at its headquarters, located off I-91 via exit 37 in Bloomfield.

For more information and directions visit www.fidelco.org or call 860-243-5200

Editor's note: All information and the photo in this post were contributed by Fidelco.





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Volunteers needed to help Comcast employees beautify New Haven school


 
NEW HAVEN –  As part of "Comcast Cares Day," community groups and the public are welcome to join the effort to provide needed improvements and “spring cleaning” Quinnipiac School,  460 Lexington Ave., according to a release.

Comcast workers will be at the school from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.  April 26, mulching, landscaping and planting flowers, the release said.  "The volunteers also will install and paint picnic tables for an outdoor eating and play area, help make the grounds around the school’s swing set safer for students, and create an indoor garden box students will use to learn more about farm-to-table healthy eating," the release said.
 
To volunteer, visit  https://www.comcastinthecommunity.com/Volunteer/Register?projectID=4707  and select United way of Greater New Haven as the partner organization.

 
Also in the release: United Way ofGreater New Haven is supporting the volunteer event at the school, which serves about 348 students in kindergarten through second grade. "The school is one of 16 Boost! schools city-wide, meaning it is part of the unique partnership among United Way, New Haven Public Schools and city that provides non-academic supports to students. "

 Comcast Cares Day is Comcast and NBCUniversal’s signature community service event, and the largest single-day corporate volunteer effort in the nation. Last year, more than 85,000 employees volunteered worldwide, including a group that beautified gardens at New Haven’s Clinton Avenue School in partnership with United Way.
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Monday, April 14, 2014

Catch a 'Wave' at the New Haven Free Public Library

NEW HAVEN – A Wave installation will be held at the New Haven Free Public Library from 1 to 3 p.m. April 26  at 133 Elm St., according to a release.

The installations also will take place at libraries in Stamford, Willimantic and New London, the release said.

The Wave "is an interactive exhibit envisioned by two Connecticut artists to raise awareness of the vital role water plays in our lives," the release said.

"The Wave’s simple design and colorful materials are intended to engage people of all ages and abilities in a contemplation of water," the release said. "Participants cut their own 'wave' out of recyclable, polycarbonate film and see it hung aloft along with hundreds of other individual shapes, to create a community wave."
 
“New Haven residents are blessed with two major waterviews: the Quinnipiac River and Long Island Sound.  The Wave installation will serve as a tangible—and  beautiful—reflection on our essential connection to water,”  said Carol Brown, the library’s programming manager, also in the release.
 
Also in the release: "Connecticut artists Susan Hoffman Fishman and Elena Kalman created The Wave two years ago in response to the 2011 tsunami that struck Japan. The Wave’s first installation in the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem (Mass,.)was so well received, Kalman said, that the artists decided to make this celebration of water a national effort. "

“There’s a limited amount of water on this planet,” Hoffman Fishman said, also in the release.  “More and more of it is being polluted, and a lot of areas in the world are now having water shortages, and we have to pay attention to that.”

 
“Sharing in the process of contributing to a local work of art that is part of a national movement connects us to an important global issue,” said Jennifer Keohane, executive director of the Connecticut Library Consortium, one of The Wave’s sponsors, in the release. “And,” she added, “The Wave certainly stands alone as a compelling work of art.”

"At each site, the artists work with public participants to build community and celebrate water. At New Haven Free Public Library, wave-shaped pieces cut by individuals will be hung from a cord that is strung and folded over the balconies in the Library’s main lobby, creating a dynamic, flowing wave in bold colors, reflecting the beauty and power of water.

Each host WAVE community was chosen because of its work to protect water. For example, in New Haven, plans are underway for a Shoreline Stabilization Project and the development of a Waterfront Park in Fair Haven."
 
Inline image 2A Mystic Aquarium’s aquatic touch tank that will be on site during the installation.

 

"The water theme continues at the Library on Wednesday, May 7, when  Tom Andersen discusses his book, "This Fine Piece of Water, an environmental history of Long Island Sound," at 6 p.m. For more information about these events, call the library at 203-946-8835.

 
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'Salamander Search to Celebrate Year of the Salamander' in Derby


In a release, the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection invites you to celebrate the “Year of the Salamander,” in an event from 3 to 4:30 p.m. April 26 at the Kellogg Environmental Center, Derby.

“Families and individuals are invited to participate in a Salamander Search,”  in the streams and wetlands at Osborndale State Park, the release said.

“Come dressed for the weather and be prepared to get a little muddy. We suggest shoes that tie rather than slip-ons,” the release said.

Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation “proclaimed as the Year of the Salamander to raise awareness for salamander conservation. DEEP is participating in this effort by shining a spotlight on Connecticut’s 12 native salamander species throughout the year. “

“Other state and federal wildlife agencies, along with several conservation organizations, are also partnering with PARC to foster appreciation and understanding of salamanders. The Kellogg Center is hosting this program to help residents become aware of the salamanders in our area and their needs for survival.”

 Kellogg Environmental Center is at 500 Hawthorne Av. The program is offered free but donations are accepted.   For information, directions, or to register, call the center at (203) 734-2513 or email donna.kingston@ct.gov

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Friday, April 11, 2014

Community Invited to Observe Yom HaShoah at JCC

 
WOODBRIDGE – Hundreds of people from Southern Connecticut are expected to gather at the Jewish Community Center of Greater New Haven  at 4 p.m., April 27 to remember the six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust in observance of Yom HaShoah, or Holocaust Remembrance Day, according to a release.
 
The center is at 360 Amity Road.
 
"Elderly Holocaust survivors, families, school children, and others will assemble at the JCC to observe this annual occasion with a solemn commemoration," the release said. "The program will feature prayers, songs, a candle-lighting ceremony, and other presentations that memorialize the men, women and children who died in the Holocaust and pay tribute to those who survived. The program is free of charge and open to the community."

 
The keynote speaker is Holocaust survivor Anita Schorr.
 
"As the only survivor of her family, Schorr epitomizes how survivors have made a difference in the world in which we live. In 1943, the Nazis sent Schorr and her family from the Jewish ghetto of Terezin to Auschwitz," the release said. At the concentration camp, Nazi guards informed women between the ages of 18 and 50 that they could sign up to do forced labor in Germany. Although only 14, she was sent to a labor camp in Hamburg and was in Bergen-Belsen at the time of liberation. She has survived, built a new life, raised a family, and contributed to both the values of society and the strength of the community.
 
The most sacred and solemn duty of the present generation is to never forget what happened during the Holocaust. The community is invited to honor those survivors who have personally experienced the worst of humanity and to provide hope and inspiration for future generations.
 
In the photo: Schorr who endured the horrors at Auschwitz as a child, speaks to 5th and 6th graders at Peck Place School in Orange in 2012 . Photo- Peter Casolino/New Haven Register 03/19/12
 

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At the New Haven Museum: 'The Influence of Egypt on Connecticut Architecture'

 
NEW HAVEN - The New Haven Museum and the Friends of Grove Street Cemetery will present a lecture, “Egypt in Connecticut: Egyptianizing Architecture from New Haven to Coventry,” at 6 p.m. April 17, according to a release.
 
The lecture will be given by "eminent archaeologist and Yale University faculty member, Colleen Manassa," the release said.
 
"During the lecture, Manassa—locally renowned for her contributions to the highly successful “Echoes of Egypt: Conjuring the Land of the Pharaohs” exhibition in 2013, at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History—will discuss the imagery and meaning of the 19th-century Grove Street Cemetery Gate design and the Egyptian Revival movement in Connecticut and New Haven," the release said.
 
The free event will be held at the museum, and will be preceded by a reception at 5:30, the release said.

"Connecticut preserves some of the most significant Egyptianizing architecture within the northeastern United States, including the striking Grove Street Cemetery gateway in New Haven, which was designed by architect Henry Austin and completed in 1847," the release said.

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